Profiling social, emotional and behavioural difficulties of children involved in direct and indirect bullying behaviours

Smith, Hannah; Polenik, Kaja; Nakasita, Shamim and Jones, Alice P.. 2012. Profiling social, emotional and behavioural difficulties of children involved in direct and indirect bullying behaviours. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 17(3-4), pp. 243-257. [Article]

[img] Text
Smithetal_2012_PrePrint.doc

Download (202kB)
[img]
Preview
Text
Smithetal_2012_PrePrint.pdf

Download (474kB) | Preview

Abstract or Description

Being involved in bullying places a child at risk of poor psychosocial and educational outcomes. This study aimed to examine the profile of behavioural, emotional and social functioning for two subtypes of bullying; direct and indirect (relational). Pupils aged between seven and eleven years old completed sociometric measures of social inclusion and bullying behaviour to identify 192 pupils considered to be involved in either direct, indirect, both or neither types of bullying. These pupils and their teachers completed a battery of assessments relating to behaviour, social competence and self-perception. All bully-groups experienced similar levels of significant social rejection. ‘Direct’ and ‘both’ groups showed the greatest number of behavioural, emotional and social difficulties, while the ‘indirect’ group showed weaknesses in self-perception, but no teacher-rated problems. Understanding the behavioural, emotional and social correlates of bullying is of particular importance for early identification of children at risk of becoming bullies and for developing targeted interventions.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/13632752.2012.704315

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology > Unit for School and Family Studies

Dates:

DateEvent
August 2012Published

Item ID:

7219

Date Deposited:

01 Oct 2012 14:32

Last Modified:

29 Apr 2020 15:48

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/7219

View statistics for this item...

Edit Record Edit Record (login required)