Trust and biased memory of transgressions in romantic relationships.

Luchies, Laura B.; Wieselquist, Jennifer; Rusbult, Caryl E.; Kumashiro, Madoka; Eastwick, Paul W.; Coolsen, Michael K. and Finkel, Eli J.. 2013. Trust and biased memory of transgressions in romantic relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104(4), pp. 673-694. ISSN 0022-3514 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Relative to people with low trust in their romantic partner, people with high trust tend to expect that their partner will act in accordance with their interests. Consequently, we suggest, they have the luxury of remembering the past in a way that prioritizes relationship dependence over self-protection. In particular, they tend to exhibit relationship-promoting memory biases regarding transgressions the partner had enacted in the past. In contrast, at the other end of the spectrum, people with low trust in their partner tend to be uncertain about whether their partner will act in accordance with their interests. Consequently, we suggest, they feel compelled to remember the past in a way that prioritizes self-protection over relationship dependence. In particular, they tend to exhibit self-protective memory biases regarding transgressions the partner had enacted in the past. Four longitudinal studies of participants involved in established dating relationships or fledgling romantic relationships demonstrated that the greater a person's trust in their partner, the more positively they tend to remember the number, severity, and consequentiality of their partner's past transgressions—controlling for their initial reports. Such trust-inspired memory bias was partner-specific; it was more reliably evident for recall of the partner's transgressions and forgiveness than for recall of one's own transgressions and forgiveness. Furthermore, neither trust-inspired memory bias nor its partner-specific nature was attributable to potential confounds such as relationship commitment, relationship satisfaction, self-esteem, or attachment orientations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031054

Additional Information:

"This article may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record."

Keywords:

memory bias, trust, dependence regulation, transgressions, close relationships

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
April 2013Published

Item ID:

8424

Date Deposited:

14 Jun 2013 07:11

Last Modified:

26 Jan 2021 23:27

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/8424

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