“It’s like my kid came back overnight”: Experiences of trans and non-binary young people and their families seeking, finding and engaging with clinical care in England

Carlile, Anna; Butteriss, Ethan and Pullen Sansfaçon, Annie. 2021. “It’s like my kid came back overnight”: Experiences of trans and non-binary young people and their families seeking, finding and engaging with clinical care in England. International Journal of Transgender Health, ISSN 1553-2739 [Article] (In Press)

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Abstract or Description

Background: Trans and non-binary children and young people in England, UK struggle to gain access to affirming clinical care, despite the international research evidence pointing towards this best practice approach. Concurrently, they are subject to constant discussion in UK national media and politics, where many negative assumptions are made about their needs, experiences and clinical provision. Their journey to seek appropriate care has not yet been documented.

Aims: We trace the experiences of trans and non-binary children and youth and their families in their decision to seek, searches for and experiences with affirmative and non-affirmative clinical input for help with their gender.

Method: 27 dyadic, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with trans and non-binary children and young people and their parents from 13 families.

Results: The process of seeking support via National Health Service clinical routes in England, UK is beset with lengthy waiting lists, issues with geographical inaccessibility, a lack of relevant clinical knowledge, and a failure to recognise the value of family expertise. Family doctors provide contraceptive hormones in lieu of proper access to puberty blocking or gender affirming hormones, and most families resort to private care they can ill afford.

Discussion: Training in gender identity and gender dysphoria is recommended for both family doctors, and children’s mental health services. Gender identity development services could be decentralised, with local hubs offering more accessible support.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1080/26895269.2020.1870188

Keywords:

gender dysphoria, non-binary, affirmative care, puberty suppression medication, CAMHS, waiting lists

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Educational Studies
Educational Studies > Centre for Identities and Social Justice

Dates:

DateEvent
21 December 2020Accepted
19 January 2021Published Online

Item ID:

29623

Date Deposited:

11 Jan 2021 11:42

Last Modified:

11 Jun 2021 14:59

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/29623

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