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Goldsmiths - University of London

The Musical Impact of Multicultural London English (MLE) Speech Rhythm

Lee, Christopher S.; Brown, Lucinda and Müllensiefen, Daniel. 2017. The Musical Impact of Multicultural London English (MLE) Speech Rhythm. Music Perception: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 34(4), pp. 452-481. ISSN 0730-7829 [Article]

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Abstract or Description

There is evidence that an emerging variety of English spoken by young Londoners—Multicultural London English (MLE)—has a more even syllable rhythm than Southern British English (SBE). Given findings that native language rhythm influences the production of musical rhythms and text setting, we investigated possible musical consequences of this development. We hypothesized that the lower vocalic durational variability in MLE and (putatively) less salient stress distinctions would go along with a preference by MLE speakers for lower melodic durational variability and a higher tolerance for stress mismatches (the non-coincidence of stress/beat strong-weak patterns) compared to SBE speakers. An analysis of two popchart song corpora by MLE and SBE artists confirmed that durational variability was lower in the MLE songs, and that there were more stress mismatches. In a follow-up experiment, MLE and SBE participants read four short English sentences and then rated text settings in pairs of specially constructed song fragments with and without stress mismatches. MLE participants’ speech showed the expected lower variability in vocalic duration and syllabic prominence compared to SBE participants’ speech, while their text setting ratings showed a greater tolerance of stress mismatches.

Item Type: Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1525/MP.2017.34.4.452

Keywords:

speech rhythm, Multicultural London English, text setting, stress mismatches, nPVI

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Psychology

Dates:

DateEvent
18 October 2016Accepted
1 April 2017Published

Item ID:

20574

Date Deposited:

19 Jun 2017 09:49

Last Modified:

04 Jul 2017 10:16

URI: http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/20574

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