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Active Learning for Active Citizenship: participatory approaches to evaluating a programme to promote citizen participation in England

Rooke, Alison and Mayo, Marjorie C.. 2008. Active Learning for Active Citizenship: participatory approaches to evaluating a programme to promote citizen participation in England. Community Development Journal, 43(3), pp. 731-781. [Article]

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Abstract or Description

Just as the notion of participatory approaches has been subjected to questioning and criticism, so has the more specific notion of participatory approaches to monitoring and evaluation. There are parallel possibilities of tokenism and even of manipulation, here, just as there are parallels around the need for more critical reflection and dialogue. Even if not actually manipulative, participatory evaluation can involve little more than the occasional use of particular techniques from a participatory toolkit.

This article draws upon our experiences of evaluating a participatory programme to promote active citizenship in England, starting from our shared commitment to achieve more than this. Building upon principles and experiences of best practice, the aim was to use participatory principles ‘in order to democratise social change’ (Cousins and Whitmore, 1998.7), addressing the challenges of putting participatory principles into practice right from the outset, through to the completion of the final report.

We begin by summarising key arguments from previous debates. This sets the context for the discussion of our case study, as evaluators of this particular programme. Finally, we conclude by reflecting upon our experiences of working with some of the tensions inherent in the processes associated with participatory monitoring and evaluation, identifying similarities with as well as differences from Kate Newman’s conclusions, on the basis of her experiences in the global South.

Item Type:

Article

Identification Number (DOI):

https://doi.org/10.1093/cdj/bsn013

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Sociology

Dates:

DateEvent
2008Published

Item ID:

5615

Date Deposited:

06 Jun 2011 12:13

Last Modified:

10 Jul 2018 00:54

Peer Reviewed:

Yes, this version has been peer-reviewed.

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/5615

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