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Artist-Programmers and Programming Languages for the Arts

McLean, Christopher Alex. 2011. Artist-Programmers and Programming Languages for the Arts. Doctoral thesis, Goldsmiths, University of London [Thesis]

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Abstract or Description

We consider the artist-programmer, who creates work through its description as source code. The artist-programmer grandstands computer language, giving unique vantage over human-computer interaction in a creative context. We focus on the human in this relationship, noting that humans use an amalgam of language and gesture to express themselves. Accordingly we expose the deep relationship between computer languages and continuous expression, examining how these realms may support one another, and how the artist-programmer may fully engage with both.

Our argument takes us up through layers of representation, starting with symbols, then words, language and notation, to consider the role that these representations may play in human creativity. We form a cross-disciplinary perspective from psychology, computer science, linguistics, human-computer interaction, computational creativity, music technology and the arts.

We develop and demonstrate the potential of this view to inform arts practice, through the practical introduction of software prototypes, artworks, programming languages and improvised performances. In particular, we introduce works which demonstrate the role of perception in symbolic semantics, embed the representation of time in programming language, include visuospatial arrangement in syntax, and embed the activity of programming in the improvisation and experience of art.

Item Type:

Thesis (Doctoral)

Keywords:

creativity, live programming, live coding, computation, music interaction, vocable synthesis, pattern domain specific language, computational creativity, bricolage programming, visual programming, psychology of programming

Departments, Centres and Research Units:

Computing > Intelligent Sound and Music Systems (ISMS)

Date:

October 2011

Item ID:

6611

Date Deposited:

02 Mar 2012 09:50

Last Modified:

12 Jul 2018 01:11

URI:

http://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/6611

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